Singly Linked List in Python

I was reading about data structures this evening and I worked out simple singly linked list. The neat thing about this implementation is that a I made it iterable, also. I’d originally wanted to provide a minimal working singly linked list, and then add features and testing with explanations, but it’s been a long day. This example assumes that you’re using Python2.7; version 3 provides a __next__ class method.

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Use Vagrant to Manage an OEL6 Virtual Machine

Vagrant is a tool that you can use to set up, configure, and access a VM through the command line. This is a life changer. I love it. In this post I’ll walk through setting up an OEL6 virtual machine, installing a non-ancient version of Python, and configuring the port forwarding so that you can use it for backend web development. (The port forwarding is not obvious on RHEL/OEL.)

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Direct and Delegated Event Handlers in jQuery

An alternate title might be: how to bind event handlers to new, or dynamically generated, table rows. When using jQuery, we attach sets of instructions to different parts of an HTML document using selectors. Suppose you wanted to attach some functionality to some text in a table, for example, when you click on a row in a table, it brings up a new table below the first table. This is actually kind of tricky, it turns out that there is a distinction between direct and delegated event handlers.

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Using Sessions in Flask

In this post I’ll provide an example of using session management in Flask. This is useful when you need to recover persistent data across different endpoints in your application. In this example, we set the permanent attribute of the session object to True in order to ensure that the session data lasts indefinitely until it is cleared when the user accesses the root endpoint again. The best practice is to have a timeout on the session data.

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Swift Optimization

I learned a hard lesson today: to make Swift really fast you have to know what you’re doing. You can’t just slap some code together and expect it to be zippy without understanding some of how Swift was designed and how it works. There is a very good presentation by some of the team members that built Swift here. My initial takeaway was that it was important to finalize any classes you didn’t plan on subclassing, incrementally check the timing analyzer, and finally, employ whole module optimization.

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